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Source Information

Ancestry.com. Jacobites of 1715 North East Scotland and Jacobites of 1745 North East Scotland [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.
Original data: McDonnell, Frances. Jacobites of 1715 and 1745. North East Scotland. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1998.

About Jacobites of 1715 North East Scotland and Jacobites of 1745 North East Scotland

The Jacobites were followers of the House of Stuart who, in 1715 and 1745, as well as a number of other occasions, attempted to regain the throne of Great Britain from the House of Hanover. Perhaps the most famous Jacobite insurrection began in August 1745, when Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) landed on the island of Eriskay and rallied his supporters at Glenfinnan, Scotland. Although the Jacobites of 1745 were able to penetrate as far south as Derby in England, they were ultimately defeated by the Hanoverians at the battle of Culloden, on the outskirts of Inverness.

In 1715 and again in 1745, a significant number of rebellious Scottish Jacobites could be found in the North East, an area dominated by Episcopalian landowners allied to the House of Stuart. This work identifies 2,000 North East Jacobites of 1715 and 1745, any number of whom either fled to France or were forcibly transported to the New World (to Maryland and Virginia, in particular). While the details vary, the biographical notices, in the aggregate, mention the individual's dates of birth and death, the names or number of his family members, his town of origin, where he participated in the rebellion, and what became of him after the insurrection was put down (capture, imprisonment, execution, transportation, or flight). All in all, this is an important effort at historical preservation and a source of potential clues on eighteenth-century Scottish forebears.

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