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Source Information

Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Registers of Land Grants and Leases, 1792-1867 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Original data:

Registers of Land Grants and Leases. Microfilm Publication 2560–2561, 2846, 2548–2550, 2700–2702, 2704–2705, 11 rolls. Record Group NRS 13836. New South Wales, Australia.

About New South Wales, Australia, Registers of Land Grants and Leases, 1792-1867

This database contains registers of land grants and leases in the colony New South Wales, Australia for the years 1792 to 1867. Written applications for the grants were required and submitted to the Colonial Secretary. Note that place names during the 18th century are non-standard as written in the registers.

Information in this database includes:

  • Name
  • Date of grant
  • Location of grant

The New South Wales colony was founded as a convict colony in 1788 and originally included the states Queensland, South Australia, and Victoria, as well as the Tasmania, Norfolk, and Lord Howe Islands. Beginning with the first Governor, Arthur Phillip, free land in New South Wales was granted to emancipists (free settlers and ex-convicts). An individual male was allowed 30 acres, 20 if they were married, and 10 for each additional child at the time of registration. To encourage free settlers to immigrate to New South Wales, non-commissioned Marine Officers could receive 100 acres of land and privates 50.

During the Rum Rebellion of 1808–1809 land grants that had been issued were cancelled, though some were later reinstated, and after 1831 free land grants were no longer offered; all land was sold at public auction. The government also had to determine a policy on squatters who were not only difficult to evict, but could not be protected from conflicts with Aborigines since they lived outside defined government boundaries. To help regulate these issues, a system of licensure was established for graziers or sheep raisers who ventured outside colony boundaries, and a border police to assist in settling conflicts.

Some of the above information was taken from:

  • Short Guide 8 – Land Grants, 1788–1856, (New South Wales, Australia: New South Wales Government State Records).

Related Website

New South Wales Government State Records
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